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Fasting may help boost metabolism: Study – Times Now

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Fasting may help boost metabolism: Study (Representational image)&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspGetty Images

Tokyo: Occasional fasting may not only help people lose weight but also boost their metabolic activity, generate antioxidants, and reverse some effects of ageing, a study claims. Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) and Kyoto University in Japan identified 30 previously-unreported substances whose quantity increases during fasting and indicate a variety of health benefits.

“We have been researching ageing and metabolism for many years and decided to search for unknown health effects in human fasting,” said Takayuki Teruya, first author of the paper published in the journal Scientific Reports.”Contrary to the original expectation, it turned out that fasting-induced metabolic activation rather actively,” said Teruya.

The study presents an analysis of whole human blood, plasma, and red blood cells drawn from four fasting individuals. The researchers monitored changing levels of metabolites — substances formed during the chemical processes that grant organisms energy and allow them to grow.

The results revealed 44 metabolites, including 30 that were previously unrecognised, that increased universally among subjects between 1.5- to 60-fold within just 58 hours of fasting. In previous research, researchers identified various metabolites whose quantities decline with age, including three known as leucine, isoleucine, and ophthalmic acid. In fasting individuals, these metabolites increase in level, suggesting a mechanism by which fasting could help increase longevity.

“These are very important metabolites for maintenance of muscle and antioxidant activity, respectively,” said Teruya.”This result suggests the possibility of a rejuvenating effect by fasting, which was not known until now,” he said. The human body tends to utilise carbohydrates for quick energy — when they are available. When starved of carbs, the body begins looting its alternate energy stores. 

The act of “energy substitution” leaves a trail of evidence, namely metabolites known as butyrates, carnitines, and branched-chain amino acids. These well-known markers of energy substitution have been shown to accumulate during fasting. However, fasting appears to elicit effects far beyond energy substitution. In their comprehensive analysis of human blood, the researchers noted both established fasting markers and many more.  For example, they found a global increase in substances produced by the citric acid cycle, a process by which organisms release energy stored in the chemical bonds of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. 

The marked increase suggests that, during fasting, the tiny powerhouses running every cell are thrown into overdrive.
Fasting also appeared to enhance the metabolism of purine and pyrimidine, chemical substances which play key roles in gene expression and protein synthesis. 

The finding suggests fasting may reprogramme which proteins cells build at what time, thus altering their function. The change may promote homeostasis in cells, or serve to edit their gene expression in response to environmental influences. The findings expand on established ideas of what fasting could do for human health. The next step would be to replicate these results in a larger study or investigate how the metabolic changes might be triggered by other means. 

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Cutting out on these foods can help combat gastrointestinal issues – Times Now

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Cutting out on these foods can help combat gastrointestinal issues (Representational Image)&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspGetty Images

London: Cutting out specific foods can alleviate gastrointestinal issues for physically active people, especially a runner, researchers say. The study, conducted by researchers from the Anglia Ruskin University in Britain, showed that a low fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyol (or FODMAP) diet reduces some of the issues caused by exercise such as stomach cramps and bloating, and improves a person’s perceived ability to exercise.

FODMAP foods include those containing lactose (milk, yoghurt and cheese), fructans (found in cereals, bread and pasta), galactic-oligosaccharides (legumes and onions), excess fructose (for example in apples, pears and asparagus) and polyols (often added as a food additive).

“We found a clear benefit when following the low FODMAP diet, with a reduction in exercise-related gastrointestinal symptoms amongst otherwise healthy, recreational runners,” said Justin Roberts, Principal Lecturer at the varsity.

For the study, the researchers involved a group of healthy recreational exercisers.  Everyone in the group followed two eating plans for one week at a time, with the key difference being the FODMAP content.

The findings, published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, found that 69 per cent of those following a low FODMAP diet experienced an improvement in symptoms and were able to exercise more frequently and at a higher intensity.

In addition, the improvement in perceived pain, in conjunction with reduced experiences of bloating whilst on a low FODMAP diet, is likely explained by a reduction in intestinal water volume and gas production, caused by fewer indigestible carbohydrates available for fermentation in the gut.

However, further studies are needed to examine the benefits of this diet when combined with long-term training strategies. It is important that people take care if deciding to follow a low FODMAP diet, as reductions in total caloric and carbohydrate intake may impact on nutritional quality, Roberts suggested.
 

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New technique to measure blood clot developed: Details inside – Times Now

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New technique to measure blood clot developed (Representational Image)&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspGetty Images

London: Scientists have developed a new technique that allows them to measure blood clotting as well as the formation of free radicals, that leads to the build-up of blood clots, which in turn cause heart disease, stroke and dementia. The technique, led by the University of Exeter researchers, investigates a part of the blood clotting process which focuses on the ways in which platelets from blood samples clump together.

“This method may be useful for future studies looking into new anti-platelet treatments for diseases such as diabetes, where clotting is disturbed and increases the risk of heart attack or stroke,” according to the study detailed in the Haematologica journal.

The researchers discovered that the enzyme NADPH Oxidase is critically important for the generation of free radicals, the stimulation of blood clotting and the promotion of blood vessel damage in patients.

They successfully used the technique in mice and human cells. Their aim is to better understand how blood cells function, which will help to develop new drugs against blood clotting diseases or to test the risk of clotting diseases in patients.

“We’re really excited to discover this new technique and its potential to understand how blood vessel diseases develop. For the first time, we can now simultaneously measure blood clotting and the formation of free radicals,” said lead author Giordano Pula, from the Exeter Medical School. 

“We know they play a key role in blood vessel damage caused by ageing, diabetes, obesity and chronic inflammation. We’re currently using this technique in our efforts to develop a new treatment to protect the blood vessels in diseases such as heart diseases, stroke, obesity, and vascular dementia,” Pula added.
 

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Simple Tips to Boost Heart Health at Work – Bel Marra Health

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February is heart health month. To ensure you’re working on improving your heart health, we wanted to share with you our simple tips to boost your heart while at work. It can be hard to always be active and eat the right foods, which are critical components of a healthy heart. This is why we want to provide you with easy steps to take to start improving your heart.

If you work a typical nine to five job, you’re likely pretty inactive during that time. For some of you, this may also mean you aren’t surrounded by the best food options either – unless you pack your own lunch.

To boost your activity levels, there are things you can add to your daily workday. For starters, if you are in a high building, consider taking the stairs more often. If you sit all day, remind yourself to move around each hour.

As mentioned, packing your own food and snacks is a good option so that you don’t binge on unhealthy foods. Pack your lunch bag with nuts, fruits, and seeds to keep you energized.

Lastly, work can be stressful, and stress can take a real negative toll on your heart health. Finding healthy ways to manage your stress can lead to better heart outcomes. This could involve stepping out for some fresh air, taking a few moments to concentrate on your breathing, or carrying around some essential oils with you to calm you down. Whatever healthy option you use to reduce stress, your heart will thank you for it.

These tips can go a long way in better controlling your cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, and even weight, which are all contributing factors to heart health.


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https://www.timesnownews.com/health/article/how-can-you-improve-your-heart-health-at-work-control-cholesterol-blood-pressure-and-reduce-weight/360841

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