Connect with us

Supplements

Best supplements for cholesterol: A pharmacist’s top two supplements for high cholesterol – Express

Published

on


Cholesterol is a fatty substance made in the liver. It is vital for the normal functioning of the body, but having too much of it in the blood can lead to heart disease. People who have high cholesterol are advised to make changes to their diet in order to lower the level of cholesterol in the blood. If patients struggle to make appropriate dietary changes or the dietary changes they make don’t help, they may be prescribed cholesterol-lowering medication. The most common medication for high cholesterol is statins. Statins block the enzymes in the liver that help to make cholesterol, leading to a reduction in cholesterol levels.

However, statins can have undesirable side effects like headaches, muscle pain and stomach problems.

Statins will only be prescribed to patients who continue to be at high risk of heart disease, according to the NHS, so making efforts to lower cholesterol via dietary changes is essential.

Express.co.uk spoke to LloydsPharmacy pharmacist Pareena Patel, who recommends two particular dietary supplements for lowering cholesterol.

Plant stanols and sterols

Stanols and sterols are plant chemicals that have a similar structure to cholesterol. They are absorbed from the intestines into the blood stream and block some cholesterol from being absorbed, in turn lowering the cholesterol in your blood.

Plant stanols and sterols can be found in foods including vegetable oils, nuts and seeds, but not in high enough quantities to lower cholesterol levels.

Because it is not possible to get enough plant stanols and sterols from an everyday diet, specialist ranges of dairy foods such as margarines and yoghurt drinks have been fortified with them to help lower cholesterol levels.

“Most diets provide a small amount, however people who have high cholesterol levels may benefit from increasing their intake by eating foods that have added fortified plant stanols,” said Patel.

“A certain amount of plant stanols and sterols must be consumed each day for the desired effect to be achieved – specifically between 1.5 and 3.0g.

“Be sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the amounts you should consume each day.”

Beta-glucan

Beta-glucan is a type of fibre that forms a gel which binds to cholesterol in the intestines. This helps limit the amount of cholesterol that is absorbed from the gut into the blood.

“Beta-glucans help to lower cholesterol levels by slowing food transit in the intestine, so the body takes longer to digest food. This means that cholesterol isn’t absorbed as quickly,” said Patel.

Beta-glucan can be found in foods such as oats and barley, but it can also be taken as a supplement.

“Lifestyle and dietary changes should always be the first step in the management of high blood cholesterol,” said Benecol nutritionist Sarah Franciosi.

“Making some simple dietary changes such as replacing saturated fat with unsaturated fat, eating more fibre, and introducing products with added plant stanols can all help to bring cholesterol levels back to within a normal healthy target range.”

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Supplements

"You're Just Peeing Out a Lot of Money." This Is the Real Way You're Flushing Your Retirement Savings Down the Drain – MONEY

Published

on

By


| Money

this link is to an external site that may or may not meet accessibility guidelines.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Supplements

FDA Sends Warning Letters on Dietary Supplements – Wall Street Journal

Published

on

By


The FDA has sent warning letters to companies marketing dietary supplements.


Photo:

Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it sent warning letters to 11 companies for marketing dietary supplements that don’t meet its guidelines.

The agency issued warnings to three companies for marketing dietary supplements containing phenibut, which is sometimes sold as a sleep aid or to treat anxiety. It said that phenibut doesn’t meet the statutory definition of a dietary ingredient, which is generally a vitamin, herb or other natural substance used to supplement the diet. 

A Wall Street Journal article last week on the $40 billion supplement industry said that phenibut, developed as a drug in the former Soviet Union, was being marketed as a “nootropic,” or brain supplement, in the U.S. A spokeswoman for the FDA said that the agency was already investigating phenibut.

The FDA also issued warnings to eight companies for marketing dietary supplements containing DMHA, a stimulant sometimes found in exercise and weight-loss supplements. The companies have 15 business days to inform the FDA of steps they will take to bring their products into compliance. That could include a decision to recall, reformulate or discontinue sales.

Supplements aren’t tightly regulated by the FDA like prescription drugs. Dietary-supplement manufacturers don’t need approval from the FDA before introducing their products to the market. The FDA has oversight for taking action against any misbranded supplement after it reaches the market.

The FDA said it is launching a new online tool to help warn consumers of ingredients that appear to be unlawfully marketed in supplements. The agency said the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Advisory List will help get cautionary information to the public more quickly before it issues any final determination. It is on the FDA website, and consumers can also sign up to receive updates and changes to the list.

Write to Anne Marie Chaker at anne-marie.chaker@wsj.com

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Supplements

New Tool Alerts Public to Unlawfully Marketed Dietary Supplement Ingredients – The Cardiology Advisor

Published

on

By


In an effort to better alert the public of unlawful ingredients in dietary supplements, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has created the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Advisory List, a new reference tool for consumers and manufacturers.

Available on the FDA website, the list includes ingredients that may not lawfully be included in dietary supplements. Consumers may wish to avoid supplements that include these ingredients as they may not fit the definition of a dietary ingredient or may require pre-market notification that was not submitted; inclusion in this list does not necessarily mean the ingredient poses a safety concern.

“It is important to note that the List is not exhaustive; it will always be a work in progress,” said Frank Yiannas, the FDA’s Deputy Commissioner for Food Policy and Response. “We expect the List will evolve as new ingredients are identified and others are removed.” In addition, the FDA will continue to communicate with the public regarding any safety concerns identified with new dietary supplement ingredients.

In a press statement, Yiannas also noted that the agency recently sent out warning letters to 8 companies that were marketing dietary supplements containing DMHA and 3 companies marketing supplements with phenibut; neither one of these currently meets the FDA’s definition of a lawful dietary ingredient. “We take these violations very seriously and stand ready to take enforcement action without further notice if the companies do not immediately cease distribution of the products,” said Yiannas. In February 2019, the FDA went after 17 companies selling unapproved and/or misbranded products (most sold as dietary supplements) claiming to prevent, treat, or cure Alzheimer disease and other serious disease and health conditions.

Consumers who wish to receive alerts related to updates to the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Advisory List can sign up here.

For more information visit FDA.gov.

Related Articles

This article originally appeared on MPR

Let’s block ads! (Why?)



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending